Could the Beatles have sang “Scrambled Eggs” instead of “Yesterday”?

I was watching a compilation of some of Jimmy Fallon’s best moments on his night talk show. One of those moments was singing along with the one and only Paul McCartney of The Beatles! McCartney said that he had a tune for “Yesterday” before he had the lyrics to the song set. To remember the melody, he put in place the following:

Placeholder lyrics: “Scrambled eggs, oh baby how I love your legs…”

instead of how we know the song today:

Released song lyrics: “Yesterday, all my troubles seems so far away…”

I think it’s safe to assume that after the first line, the rest of the song was made as a joke for a musical skit. Regardless, I had a really good laugh.

“Yesterday” is one of my favorite Beatles songs. Whenever I hear it, I feel  pretty nostalgic and reflective. It might be hard to feel the same way after hearing the version from this skit haha.

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Finding New Music in the Age of the Internet

As you have probably guessed by my last two posts, I have been swamped with school work so badly that I have had to use whimsical .gifs as blog posts. During that time, I have been on the hunt for new music since my own playlist has gotten old after hours upon hours of listening to it while I work.

While still a viable method, its more uncommon for hunting for new jams to be done while hanging out at the music store, a waiting for new releases or listening to the radio as your source of new music feed. Here’s some new methods if you haven’t heard yet.

1) Pandora Radio

Being in existence for over a decade, this method is far from new. However, you would be surprised how many people do not know about Pandora. It creates music radio stations based on your music preferences. This is done by the ability of the user to “like” or “dislike” songs. The site takes into account musical attributes of positively received songs, and uses this information to find music with similar components that you would most likely like based on this feedback. The opposite is done for songs that are “disliked.” You can also input your own similar artists or songs into Pandora to fuel the attributes that they should be looking for you.

Pandora holds the patent on the “Music Genome Project” (obviously a title spun off the Human Genome Project, hee-hee). Each song is characterized by 400 “genes” or characteristic of music. Some examples include background vocals, lead guitar, ect. Using this great amount of information, Pandora can attempt to recommend music cater to the user’s taste.

pandora

Read more about it here on Wiki:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandora_Radio

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_Genome_Project

2) 8 Tracks

A slightly newer method and founded in 2008, 8tracks brings back the magic and cuteness of mixed tapes. Users can create their own playlists and share them publicly. More importantly, their exploration gimmick is that you can search for playlists based on your mood or type of music you like. For example, if I woke up one morning and wanted happy music, I would click those items, and 8tracks would show me hits that match those moods. Similarly  if I was studying and for some awful reason I thought it was a good idea to listen to dubstep, 8tracks would also find me playlists with those elements.

8tracks

Read more about it here on Wiki:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8tracks.com

I really like Pandora and 8 tracks because I can put something on in the background without the same canned songs on the radio or my ipod and open myself to new music I didn’t know was available, without sacrificing my productivity and concentration on work.

“I Could Be the One” Video

I saw this video on my Facebook newsfeed. It’s called “I Could Be the One (Nicktim)” a Avicii vs Nicky Romero mix. It’s quite a catchy song. Now, what I can’t decide is whether I like the video or not. I like that it perfectly describes how life can become so mundane and routine if you let it. I’m not a fan of the ending, though it kinda fit the crazy and somewhat vulgar themes of the video haha.

Dangers of Canned Tuna

Introduction:

I’d like to preface this entry with my strong recommendation to read “Slow Death by Rubber Duck” by Rick Smith & Bruce Lourie. I talked about reading this book for my Toxicology I class back at the end of October. I had finally gotten the chance to finish it before the term ended in December, and I really loved what I learned about the classes of common chemicals in consumer products. It also really emphasizes the point that while we cannot avoid completely the dangerous chemicals we have synthesized and incorporated into our daily life, it does not mean that we should not be aware and attempt to limit the amount of contact we have. A large amount of control can be done by checking the contents of what products we are buying.

slowdeathbyrubberduck

Figure 1. “Slow Death by Rubber Duck: How the Toxic Chemistry of Everyday Life Affects Our Health” book cover.

Chapter 5: The Tuna Feast Experiment

Chapter 5 entitled “Quicksilver, Slow Death,” examines the dangers of mercury and how easily its levels are increased. The author who took this challenge, Bruce, monitored his mercury blood levels for several weeks while eating a diet consisting heavily on fish. This means a lot of sushi, sashimi, tuna steaks, tuna salads, tuna sandwiches, ect.

tuna

Figure 2. A nice, wholesome tuna sandwich.

During the tuna feasting experiment, the author was surprised to find how easily tuna levels had doubled after just 24 hours of his meals. What is even more alarming is that as the experiment went on, mercury levels continued to increase rapidly at an exponential rate, far above the “safe” level of mercury in the blood. It seemed as though mercury is easily accumulated in the body fat, but is not easily cleared out of body via metabolizing factors or excrement.  This results in a chemical build up, which consequently changed Bruce’s normal personality and mood.

Relating to My Own Life

This chapter is  is a prime example of how awareness can help prevent getting sick.  The chapter starts by quoting an actress who went on a Mediterranean diet, which was built around eating tons of fish, including tuna. She started having fits of dizziness and fainting, and later she  realized it was linked to the high mercury content due to her diet.

TunaFork

Figure 3. Cans of tuna…yuck.

Firstly, I think that this brings up a good point of why diets that emphasize eating only one type of food is bad. A key to a healthy life is a balance of many types of foods, and a diet could lead to a build-up of something that can harm you. In this case, it was mercury. In fact, I have had a first-hand experience with this. During my internship over my summer, I had eaten tuna with cucumbers and crackers every single day for lunch for a quick meal between lab experiments. I would attribute my headaches and ill feelings to the humid and hot weather, but when I had gotten so bad that I was going back and forth to the doctor constantly for a recurring UTI (something that has never, ever hit me before). After taking Tox I class, I now know that metals in high concentrations can act as an immuno-repressant, leaving your body highly susceptible to foreign or “bad” bacteria invasions.

Solution & Conclusion

A point they bring up in this chapter is about bioaccumulation. Larger fish live longer and eat smaller fish that also contain mercury. Because of this, large fish accumulate a lot of mercy. Being on the top of the food chain, human beings consume this large fish and get the highest dosage of the deadly mercury. Especially in a society where bigger is always better, we need to be aware of the build-up of these harmful substances in our food or else it will immediately make a large impact on our health.

Because of the biomagnification of mercury in larger fish, the authors suggest to try to eat smaller fish as suppose to larger fish as a possible preventative action.

mercycle

Figure 4. Infographic of a mercury cycle

Hope you enjoyed this! If you do not have time or are not interested in reading all of “Slow Death by Rubber Duck” below is a link to chapter summaries. Perhaps they will intrigue you to pick up the book or download the eReader version.

LINK: “Slow Death by Rubber Duck” Chapter summaries

Finals Week Destressers – Fall Term ’12 Edition

So this post is very belated, but as I tried to type before, I spilled a bit of coffee on my laptop and now its on the fritz. Luckily, my sister, bro-in-law, and I bought mom and dad a new laptop (they have never had one before), and thank goodness I can use it. I’m on break now, but busy as a bee. More on that in later updates though.

I’d like to write about some of the things that have kept me sane during finals and interviews while at school this term. Since blogging wasn’t an option, here’s what satisfied my need for break time.

  1. My Guilty Pleasure Music

    I have no idea if Jazz dance class has soften my ears to mainstream pop, but I am sorta embarrassed to say I have been blasting Ke$ha’s “Die Young” and T. Swift’s “I Knew You Were Trouble.” Shoot me, they are catchy as hell.





  2. This Chem-E Student’s Crazy Dancing
    To the T. Swift song I just mentioned! I can partially blame this dude with my weird music cravings, too, I suppose.



    Not convinced of how hilarious this guy is? Watch his moves to Cher Lloyd’s “Want U Back” (which was one of the songs we used in Jazz coincidentally).



    I have a strange sense of humor, but at least I know Naomi shares it with me. We were studying in the Science Building, DYING with laughter behind textbooks.
  3. Flash Game: Sushi Cat

    Let me preface this with I don’t really play video games as much anymore. It’s a sad fact. But I wanted something mindless to do in between studying. What better way than a flash game! I haven’t been to AddictingGames.com since Sophomore year, but BEHOLD they never fail me!

    sushicat1

    This game is about a cat and his “wife” (which happens to be a stuffed animal). During this edition of the game, you are trying to eat as much sushi as  you can to get bigger and overcome obstacles to reunite with your lovely pink wifey.

    sushicat2

    As Aniket kept making fun of me, I realized you can’t call this a “game” per say because all you do is control where to drop the cat. I could argue that there is some strategic physics involved, but really that’s stretching it. However, the unlockable cute outfits made me want to finish the game in its entirety. I can’t help my love for fat kittens!

    sushicat3

    There are also 2 or 3  previous games of Sushi Cat, one of which you fight Bacon Dog to win you wife back. Yea, I got a little crazy.

    Link to game: http://www.addictinggames.com/puzzle-games/sushi-cat-2-the-great-purrade-game.jsp

Alright that’s it from me for now 🙂 Now that I’m break with a keyboard that works, hopefully I can get back to writing more.

Invigorating Study Jam: Kiara Sound Medik Remix

I’m not going to lie. I have had a bit of down time at work lately (in fact,yesterday was my last full day!), if you cannot tell by the sudden surge of posts. And, as coincidence, most of the stuff I have written lately is about music. I’ve been trying to write and re-write and re-re-re-write my resume to include my final coop. I don’t think I have been so tedious or so horribly hit with professional writer’s blocker ever. Anyway, I’ve been jamming to a lot of music to inspire me, hence all the music posts.

Anyways, the next song I’m writing about is a remix of Bonobo’s “Prelude + Kiara,” which as you may know, is my favorite song of all time. OF ALL TIME. While I still like the original better, this remix by Sound Medik is a nice change of pace and really wakes up the senses.

You can also download the song for free via these weblinks:

http://soundcloud.com/sound-medik/bonobo-kiara-sound-medik-remix

http://www.mediafire.com/?6w9vajie1j23a2z (Courtesy of VanCity Sounds)

Enjoy!